Razor Faded Side Part – Step by Step Instructions

Let Uppercut Deluxe show you how to style your own hair into a styled side part using Uppercut Deluxe Pomade.

As part of our How to: Grooming series this guide introduces you to the hairstyle that you can achieve using Uppercut Deluxe Pomade. These step-by-step images will give you the know how to achieve a great style with a product that is designed to make styling simple and lasting.

How To Style a Razor Faded Side Part

STEP 1
Using Uppercut Deluxe Pomade, scoop a generous amount of product onto your finger
STEP 2

Smooth and spread the product evenly across your palms and fingers

STEP 3

Start by using your fingertips to lift your fringe section applying product from root to tip as you go

STEP 4

Move to your top section, raking your fingers through. Smooth into shape using your palms

STEP 5

Using your fingertips, apply product to the short side and top section, away from your parting

Using an Uppercut Deluxe comb, set your parting along your short side

STEP 6
STEP 7

Move to the top section and comb across your head away from your parting

STEP 8

Lift your fringe section, combing up and back. Use your hands to set

FINISH

Tend to any fly away hairs using your hands or to add texture to your style

 

To achieve this look, it all starts at the barber shop. Make sure you find a barber that you trust to achieve the desired look. Ask your barber to start by using the clippers on your back and sides to go high and tight. Then make sure you ask for a hard part along the part line and faded the sides down to a skin faded using a razor, being sure to maintain the length on top and through the fringe for styling.

What you will need

Uppercut Deluxe Pomade
Quiff roller
Comb

A Bit Of History – The Straight Razor

The straight razor is something that has evolved gradually since the 1600’s to become what we use in barbershops today. Various improvements to the quality of the steel used to forge razors to assure the cleanest cut possible. Between the 1500’s to 1600’s blades resembled small hatchets without handles and as they evolved into the 1800’s we started seeing engraved designs and wooden, horn and bone handles, with more sought after pieces craved from tortoise shell and ivory. Moving into the 1900’s the razor became much smaller and easier to handle and carry which is reflective in the straight razors of today.